Semiotics and the development of number sense

What is a number, really? Or to put it another way: think of the lights on a traffic light, the segments of the circle in the Mercedes-Benz logo, the beats in one measure of a waltz rhythm, the way Julius Caesar divided up Gaul, the colors on the U.S. flag, a three-liter bottle of Coca-Cola – what do these things have in common? Philosophers have claimed that there is a Platonic essence of “three-ness” that exists in all of these instances, and math educators look for children to develop a “number sense” that allows them to recognize it in all its different manifestations. But what if this is looking at it backward? What if “three,” as a concept, begins in our direct experience of the world? I’m going to talk through this line of reasoning, drawing on previous research on the development of number sense in children, and thinking it out using the semiotic theory of C. S. Peirce.

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

The Joseph Campbell Method of Social Science Research

The Hero's Journey

(Context)


Read more ›

Tagged with:
Posted in fun

Sunday Reading

Lately I’ve been enjoying The New Inquiry’s Sunday Reading feature, which is meta-curated by Aaron Bady. In fact, one of my own articles was featured one time, which totally made my day.

The idea struck me recently that I should try to do my own, so I can keep track of what I’ve been interested in, and so that my readers can see what I’m interested in that isn’t (or is only tangentially) related to linguistics. So, without further preamble, here we go:
Read more ›

Posted in fun

Book mash

image

“So, what are you going to do
with that excitable speech?”
The hidden life
Of girls talking science
Amongst mathematicians

Tagged with:
Posted in Uncategorized

What’s an ethnographer to do?

In my last post, I wrote about ways of explaining what I do in such a way that teachers will see a purpose to it. The way I framed it was more or less like so: I do my work, and I involve teachers in it as much as I can, and then I try to convince teachers that what I’ve learned through my research is useful to them as well.

Reading about the alt-ac and post-ac movements, though, I’m coming to think that’s not the best way. “My research” isn’t something I’ve done — it’s whatever I’m doing now, and something I’m continually redefining as I progress with it. So why not start by talking to teachers and looking for what might be useful?

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Applications

The credibility gap in education research

As an education researcher, I’m trying to do work with useful applications, but at some point it’ll be up to teachers to decide if they see any value in it. Reading the comments on different internet forums, I’m starting to worry about how hard it is to be credible as a researcher. For example, there’s this, cut and pasted (and anonymized) from the Badass Teachers Association’s Facebook group:

Q: If you could wave a magic wand and control the training, what would YOU like for professional development?

A: Absolutely not one dang thing from an education professor. If and when they ever get off their high horse, and if and when they can walk into my classroom and accomplish what little I’m able to, and if and when they can find even one squidet of the energy I use every day just to try to make a difference — then MAYBE they’ll have something to say Im willing to respect.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Applications

One-page dissertation proposal abstract

Background:

Prepare an abstract of the proposed study that describes the study in layman’s terms. The Abstract should be approximately one-page in length.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Dissertation
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 936 other followers